Last edited by Arashimuro
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

5 edition of Oceans in world history found in the catalog.

Oceans in world history

Rainer F. Buschmann

Oceans in world history

by Rainer F. Buschmann

  • 103 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by McGraw-Hill in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ocean and civilization,
  • Civilization -- History,
  • World history,
  • Ocean -- History,
  • Globalization

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementRainer F. Buschmann.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsCB465 .B87 2007
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 138 p. :
    Number of Pages138
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19567823M
    ISBN 100073019038
    ISBN 109780073019031
    LC Control Number2006048126
    OCLC/WorldCa69792784

      The Indian Ocean in World History also discusses issues of trade and production that show the long history of exchange throughout the Indian Ocean world; politics and empire-building by both regional and European powers; and the role of religion and religious conversion, focusing mainly on Islam, but also mentioning Hinduism, Buddhism and /5(42). The thesis that world history is the story of controlling trade in the Indian Ocean works beautifully. It's fairly short, but engaging and clearly written, with fun details and examples. Yes, it's got a desperately uninspiring cover and the publisher didn't promote it at all.5/5(2).

    Ocean - Ocean - Origin of the ocean waters: The huge volume of water contained in the oceans (and seas), × cubic km (about 33 × cubic miles), has been produced during Earth’s geologic history. There is little information on the early history of Earth’s waters. However, fossils dated from the Precambrian some billion years ago show that bacteria and cyanobacteria (blue. The World Ocean or Global Ocean (colloquially the sea or the ocean) is the interconnected system of Earth's oceanic waters, and comprises the bulk of the hydrosphere, covering ,, square kilometres or ,, square miles (%) of Earth's surface, with a total volume of roughly 1,,, cubic kilometres (,, cubic miles).Average depth: 3, m (12, ft).

    Students are also asked to match the Ocean fact with the correct ocean. At the end of the lesson, students will be able to define ocean, identify and list some facts of the five oceans of the world, and locate the oceans on a world map. This page is currently inactive and is retained for historical reference. Either the page is no longer relevant or consensus on its purpose has become unclear. To revive discussion, seek broader input via a forum such as the village pump. For more info please see Wikipedia:Village pump (technical)/Archive #Suppress rendering of Template:Wikipedia books.


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Oceans in world history by Rainer F. Buschmann Download PDF EPUB FB2

Admiral Stavridis's book, "Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans", is a book well crafted piece of work. It is excellent in its delivery of understanding the role the sea in shaping world affairs from beginnings of men voyaging on open waters to today with naval forces able to project power across the globe/5().

"The Indian Ocean in World History proves to be an excellent source of information, especially in the emerging trend of 'new world history' By taking a holistic approach to writing about history, the reader leaves with a rich sense of identity for the Indian Ocean Cited by: Summary: Explores cross-cultural encounters in the context of exploration, migration, and trade across the world's oceans.

From the early migrations of Austronesian people to the increasing globalization of recent centuries, this book examines trans-oceanic communication and exchange as a major motor of transformation in World History.

From the early migrations of Austronesian people to the increasing globalization of recent centuries, it examines trans-oceanic communication and exchange as a major motor of transformation in World History, providing readers with better appreciation of how oceans connect human societies, rather than separate them/5(4).

I'm ashamed to admit that before I read this book I saw the world through a Pacific versus Atlantic lens. While that may be understandable given the history of the last century, for much of recorded history the Indian Ocean was arguably the most dynamic region in the world, bringing together not only different ethnicities and cultures but also different religions and bodies of knowledge/5.

Freelance writer Krieger’s delight in the nautical world and compassion for financially insecure tramp owners are infectious. The adventures are recounted vividly – the massive S.T. Crapo’s precarious traversal of the narrow Saginaw River; cattle-loading on the Tasmania-bound Lady Jillian, and others.

Published by Chronicle Books August 1. Oceans in World History Paperback – Sept. 8 by Rainer Buschmann (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Amazon Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" CDN$ CDN$ CDN$ Author: Rainer Buschmann.

The history of the Indian Ocean provides a snapshot of many of the key issues in world history, such as colonialism, trade and spread of cultures and religions.

It is important reading for all students of world by: While there is abundant literature on both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans in world history, the Indian ocean is finally getting its due with this book.

In six highly informative chapters Edward A. Alpers has traced the cultural and terrestrial history of the Indian ocean from the time of the Indus Valley civilization through to the early part /5(13). "The Indian Ocean in World History proves to be an excellent source of information, especially in the emerging trend of 'new world history' By taking a holistic approach to writing about history, the reader leaves with a rich sense of identity for the Indian Ocean and the people who have called the region home."—Education About AsiaBrand: Oxford University Press.

Beautiful underwater photography. Looks great on iPad. Very nice book. Recommended. OCEAN FACTS are given throughout. Here is one: The deep sea is the largest museum on Earth: There are more artifacts and remnants of history in the ocean than in all of the world's museums, combined.4/5.

Using a broad geographic perspective, the book includes references to connections between the Indian Ocean world and the Americas.

Moving into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Alpers looks. The Indian Ocean in World History also discusses issues of trade and production that show the long history of exchange throughout the Indian Ocean world; politics and empire-building by both regional and European powers; and the role of religion and religious conversion, focusing mainly on Islam, but also mentioning Hinduism, Buddhism and Christianity.

The Indian Ocean in World History book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers.

Throughout history, dominance of the Indian Ocean 4/5. Using a broad geographic perspective, the book includes references to connections between the Indian Ocean world and the Americas.

Moving into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Alpers looks at issues including the new configuration of colonial territorial boundaries after World War I.

The late undersea explorer sets out the fascinating story of the oceans in fact, lore, and legend. An eyepopping, beautifully designed volume, brimming over with glorious full-color photographs of the ocean's bounty and its most secret underwater habitats, this book includes 18 lively chapters covering all aspects of life in the sea: evolution, reproduction, foodgetting,/5.

Buy The Indian Ocean in World History (New Oxford World History) by Alpers, Edward A. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(13).

Get this from a library. The Indian Ocean in world history. [Milo Kearney] -- "The Indian Ocean in World History provides a useful synthesis of many of the key issues in world history, such as colonialism, trade, and spread of cultures and religions. It is compulsive reading.

Review: Edward A. Alpers' "The Indian Ocean in World History". The Indian Ocean in World History - Ebook written by Edward A. Alpers. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark /5(3). The history of the Indian Ocean provides a snapshot of many of the key issues in world history, such as colonialism, trade and spread of cultures and religions.

It is important reading for all students of .Callum Roberts’s book The Unnatural History of the Sea returns to the more destructive things happening to the ocean, tracing the roots of overfishing.

This book goes through the sequence of events that led us to today’s depleted ocean. It takes you back to a time when people believed the oceans were essentially inexhaustible.The "Seven Seas" (as in the idiom "sail the Seven Seas") is an ancient phrase for all of the world's oceans.

Since the 19th century, the term has been taken to include seven oceanic bodies of water: the Arctic Ocean; the North Atlantic Ocean; the South Atlantic Ocean; the Indian Ocean; the North Pacific Ocean; the South Pacific Ocean; the Southern (or Antarctic) Ocean.